Bill of Rights Quiz

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Question 1
How many amendments make up the Bill of Rights?

A
3
B
5
C
10
D
20
Question 1 Explanation: 
The first ten amendments to the Constitution are known as the Bill of Rights. They were passed in 1789 and ratified in 1791.
Question 2
What was the primary reason for enacting the Bill of Rights?

A
To protect the civil rights of the American people
B
To more clearly define the implied powers granted to Congress
C
To demonstrate unequivocally that the Constitution was designed to be changed
D
To create confusion and stall the federal government’s efforts to grow too quickly
Question 2 Explanation: 
The Bill of Rights protects American civil rights. These amendments outline which rights may not be restricted by government. Advocates of limited government supported the Bill of Rights as a measure to prevent tyranny.
Question 3
What right is guaranteed by the First Amendment?

A
Freedom of speech
B
Freedom to petition the government
C
Freedom to assemble
D
All of the above
Question 3 Explanation: 
The First Amendment declares that the government may not pass or enforce laws that limit the freedom of a citizen to practice religion, speak, assemble, or petition the government.
Question 4
What does the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment prohibit?

A
Cruel and unusual punishment
B
Double Jeopardy
C
A state-sponsored religion
D
Unreasonable searches and seizures
Question 4 Explanation: 
The establishment clause prohibits the federal government from creating or supporting a national religion. Along with the Free Exercise Clause that follows, the Establishment Clause enshrines the principle of "separation of church and state" in the United States.
Question 5
Which of the following describes the protections of free speech granted by the First Amendment?

A
People can say whatever they want in public or private without fear of legal repercussions
B
Freedom of speech only apply to oral communication
C
Freedom of speech does not apply to recordings or broadcasts
D
Although freedom of speech extends beyond the spoken word, it does not prevent prosecution for obscenities and malicious falsehoods
Question 5 Explanation: 
Freedom of speech has been interpreted by the U.S. Supreme Court to apply to many modes of communication, including art, music, recordings, clothing, signs, and broadcasts. Individuals, however, can be prosecuted for such forms of malicious speech as plagiarism, inciting violence, libel, slander, and some kinds of obscenities.
Question 6
How does freedom of the press benefit the American people?

A
Newspapers can charge customers whatever they want
B
The press is free to report on the actions of the government and hold its members accountable without fear of censorship or punishment
C
News reporters and publishers cannot be charged with a crime
D
All of the above
Question 6 Explanation: 
A free press is crucial to a democracy because it provides citizens access to what their government is actually doing. Without this open reporting, citizens would have a difficult time holding their representatives accountable. Government-controlled media can be used to create and spread misinformation and propaganda.
Question 7
What is protected by the First Amendment’s freedom of assembly?

A
Forming a political party
B
Creating a labor union
C
Gathering to protest the government
D
All of the above
Question 7 Explanation: 
The freedom of assembly allows Americans to create, join, and/or participate in groups without fear of being legally prosecuted for doing so. These actions can be regulated by the government (e.g., granting permits), but they cannot be banned outright.
Question 8
Which of the following is an example of a petition that would be protected by the First Amendment?

A
A thirty-year-old man sends an email to the President asking that a favorite teacher be considered for an award.
B
A child writes a letter to their state senator complaining about federal education funding.
C
Two thousand people sign a letter expressing concern about a proposed federal law.
D
All of the above
Question 8 Explanation: 
The freedom to petition allows Americans to write government officials and institutions without fear of legal reprisal. It does not matter how many people come forward or in what format the writing is presented.
Question 9
What is another term for “willfully telling lies to damage a person’s reputation?”

A
Libel
B
Slander
C
Obscenity
D
Perjury
Question 9 Explanation: 
While the First Amendment allows for the freedom of speech, should that speech be both false and purposefully targeting a person’s reputation, it is called slander. Slander is not a constitutionally protected form of speech.
Question 10
The Second Amendment protects the rights of the American people:

A
To make formal requests of the Government to remedy grievances
B
To own and carry weapons
C
To peacefully assemble
D
To be secure from unreasonable searches and seizure
Question 10 Explanation: 
The Second Amendment states, “A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” The extent of these protections generates much political debate, and the Supreme Court has made many rulings to clarify the scope of gun rights in the United States.
Question 11
The Third Amendment was a response to which piece of British legislation?

A
The Stamp Act
B
The Quartering Act
C
The Tea Act
D
The Sugar Act
Question 11 Explanation: 
The Third Amendment prohibits the government from lodging soldiers into someone’s residence without permission. The British government used this method of quartering during their colonial rule.
Question 12
How does the Fourth Amendment limit how evidence can be gathered for use in a criminal proceeding?

A
Without exceptions, officers and agents of the government need a judge to approve a search warrant before searching for or taking evidence.
B
With a few exceptions, officers and agents of the government need a judge to approve a search warrant before searching for or taking evidence.
C
With a few exceptions, officers and agents of the government need a legislator to approve a search warrant before searching for or taking evidence.
D
Evidence can be gathered in any way necessary as long as it leads to a criminal conviction.
Question 12 Explanation: 
The Fourth Amendment guards against unreasonable searches and seizures by requiring a judicially sanctioned warrant that is supported by probable cause. The search warrant must specify the place to be searched and the things to be seized. Exceptions are made for obtaining evidence that is in plain sight and collecting evidence that is found during a consented (as opposed to warranted) search.
Question 13
The Fifth Amendment guarantees the right:

A
To a speedy and public trial
B
To worship any god
C
To peacefully assemble
D
To be tried only once for the same offense
Question 13 Explanation: 
The Fifth Amendment protects against double jeopardy, i.e., being tried twice for the same offense. It also protects people from self-incrimination, provides for due process, and requires the government to pay for any private property it seizes.
Question 14
How does the Fifth Amendment protect property owners against eminent domain seizures?

A
The government may not take a citizen’s private property for public use.
B
The government may only take a citizen’s private property for public use with written permission and payment of at least double the property’s fair market value.
C
The government may only take a citizen’s private property for public use if they pay the owner the property’s fair market value.
D
While the government may take a citizen’s private property for public use, the Constitution does not condone the practice.
Question 14 Explanation: 
Eminent domain seizures are legal, but the government is constitutionally obligated to provide the owner “just compensation” — interpreted as the market value of the property.
Question 15
Which of the following situations would be a violation of a citizen’s Sixth Amendment rights?

A
An accused person is made to wait three years for their case to go to trial.
B
An accused person is not informed of the crime of which they are accused.
C
An accused person is not given the opportunity to face the person accusing them of the crime.
D
All of the above
Question 15 Explanation: 
The Sixth Amendment guarantees speedy, public, and fair trials for the accused. This includes the right to a trial by jury, the right to legal representation, the right of the accused to face their accusers, and the right to call witnesses in defense.
Question 16
What right does the Eight Amendment grant those convicted of a crime?

A
The accuser cannot be present in the courtroom for sentencing
B
Each person convicted of a crime can apply for an appeal once in their lifetime
C
The sentence must not be excessive or disproportionate to the degree of the offense for which they were convicted
D
They can post bail to delay going to prison for up to ten years
Question 16 Explanation: 
The Eighth Amendment prohibits the use of “cruel and unusual punishment.” This means the sentence should match the severity of the crime; e.g., an unpaid speeding ticket should not result in a 30-year prison sentence.
Question 17
The Ninth Amendment declares that:

A
The listing of specific rights in the Constitution does not diminish other rights that are retained by the people
B
The powers not delegated by the Constitution are reserved for the states
C
States may not secede from the Union
D
Natural rights supersede legal rights
Question 17 Explanation: 
The Bill of Rights was written to address Anti-Federalist objections to the Constitution. It did this by providing specific guarantees of personal freedoms and rights, while placing clear limitations on the government's power. However, the Federalists were concerned that by listing out these specific rights, there may be an implication that any unlisted rights belong to the federal government. The Ninth Amendment was written to address these concerns, declaring that the listing of certain rights in the Constitution will not revoke or degrade other rights retained by the people.
Question 18
The Tenth Amendment reserves all undelegated powers for the ___________.

A
executive branch
B
legislative branch
C
judicial branch
D
states or the people
Question 18 Explanation: 
Nowhere is the Founders’ intent to empower the American people more clearly spelled out than in the Tenth Amendment. This amendment states that unless a power is explicitly granted to the federal government or prohibited by the Constitution, it is reserved to the States, or the people.
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